3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell

Stock code: 3604
filler

Pricing:Ex VATInc VAT
1+
£2.15
£2.58
10+ £2.05 £2.46
100+ £1.70 £2.04
Stock:
In stock

Description

Same Day Dispatch

  • Orders placed online before 3:00pm Monday - Friday (excluding public holidays and our Christmas shutdown period) are always dispatched the same day provided the goods are in stock. If the goods are not in stock we will endeavour to contact you as soon as possible to discuss a dispatch date.

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  • If you live on the UK mainland and don't have any large materials or lithium batteries in your order it will cost £3.95 (£4.74 including VAT) if you spend less than £40 (£48 including VAT).
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  • If you spend over £200 (£240.00 including VAT, excluding large materials or lithium batteries) delivery is free within the UK.

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Further Information

Q:
CAN THIS P/N BE CUSTOMIZED TO OUR APPLICATION?
SIMPLY THE DIMESION WOULD BE DIFFERENT. THE ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS ARE FINE.
Asked by: Aman Siffeti
A:
Hi Aman,

Thank you for your email, I am afraid the size could not be adjusted.

Best Regards

Cullen
Answered by: Cullen Lewis
12-Mar-20

Q:
I have a solar battery light for a dark corner outside my house, but it does not receive enough sunlight so I intend to add a more powerful solar cell in parallel that I can position to catch more light. Do I need to run this through a diode? How would a diode help, if it does? What capacity diode would be appropriate for a 3V, 100mA cell?
Asked by: Gerald Dorey
A:
Hi Gerald,

Thank you for your question, I would recommend you use a diode when attempting this. The diode would prevent the flow of electrical current in the wrong direction which could damage the existing battery pack inside the solar light.

We have some more details on this in our 2168 project kit, particularly the resources at the bottom of the page. I would recommend using the diode from there which is a BAT41 Signal Diode.

https://www.kitronik.co.uk/2168-solar-power-starter-kit.html

Best Regards

Cullen
Answered by: Cullen Lewis
07-Dec-18

Q:
I have purchased this with motor 2501-01 for my sons science project. Can you please let me know can I use a halogen torch as a power source to demonstrate solar energy? if yes, what kind of torch do I need to purchase?
Asked by: Rahul Bagchi
A:
Hi Rahul, You should be able to use a halogen torch, however the solar cell will work best with natural light. You may also be able to get it to work with incandescent and fluorescent bulbs, however again it may not work as well as it would with natural sunlight.
Answered by: Michael Lockhart
05-Jul-18

Q:
Can the solar module power the microbit card?
Asked by: olivier boudou
A:
Thank you for your question,

In theory yes as the micro:bit draws around 100mA of current but you would likely struggle as the current draw of the micro:bit will fluctuate up and down and the solar cell can experience voltage and current drops as the sunlight weakens so would not be suitable for a steady supply.

The better way of doing this would be to use a solar cell to charge rechargeable batteries and have the batteries power the micro:bit.

Best

Cullen
Answered by: Cullen Lewis
06-Jun-18

Q:
If i connect it to a battery will it charge or will it need a diode??????????????????????????????????!!!!!!! ;-; :-) ;-) XD Xd
Asked by: UFB
A:
Hi there,

If you connect it directly to a component then it should still be powered, provided it can supply enough current. It just helps to add a diode into the circuit.
Answered by: Cullen Lewis
06-Dec-17

Q:
I have to charge a lithium 3v RCR123A in winter sunlight. How many of these cells would need to be connected together to achieve this?
Also, would a diode be necessary?
BW.
Asked by: John Dines
A:

Hi John, After having a look into these batteries it is stressed that the original charger should be used to charge the batteries and you shouldn’t create/use a different charge. As such we aren’t able to provide any further recommendations other than this. Sorry.

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
07-Feb-17

Q:
Hi
Do you have a graph of output current versus light level. I need to charge a 3V Lithium Ion Cell of 250mAh capacity with the light levels of a typical English winters day of 7 hours daylight. Can it be done? (250/7 = 35mA/hour.)

Regards

Asked by: Peter Mackay
A:

Hi Pete, We have looked into this via a datasheet and testing this ourselves and unfortunately during winter sun you wouldn’t be able to get the solar cell to output enough current to charge this battery. During direct sun it would be able to, but shaded or indirect sun light wouldn’t be able to produce enough voltage or current. 

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
06-Jan-17

Q:
Could this be used (with a diode) to recharge a 9v rechargeable battery in your mono amp circuit?
Thanks
Asked by: Chris cain
A:

You could in theory use a solar cell to charge a battery. To charge a 9V battery you would want to us 2 5V solar cells, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/3608-50v-130ma-polycrystalline-solar-cell.html connected in series along with your diode. This will drop the voltage from 10V’s to around 9.3V’s, and depending on the capacity of the battery would depend on the length of time it would take to charge.

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
11-Apr-16

Q:
Hi
I have a dummy house alarm box on my shed, a solar panel charges 2 x 1.5 batteries to get 2 LED's to flash through the night, it works well but in the winter doesn't get enough light to flash the lights all the time, I was thinking of upgrading the solar panels and I could actually squeeze 2 of these (3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell) onto the alarm, this would be much larger than the one fitted, so if your still awake my question is would they need wiring in series or parallel? and should doubling up help create more charge for the battery?
Thanks
Asked by: Dave
A:

You would want to wire them in parallel and not series. Wiring in parallel would increase the mA and would keep the voltage the same, this way you would generate more charge without the increase in voltage. See attached a link to an image showing an example, http://theelectricenergy.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/series-and-parallel-solar-cells-connected.jpg

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
26-Feb-16

Q:
Given a good sunny day in southern England in the Summer, what mA could I expect to get from the 3.0V 100mA solar cell. I'm designing a small solar powered model aircraft/glider, using a kitronik 3v motor.

regards
Asked by: Peter Brown
A:

The maximum that can be outputted is 100mA, however this requires direct and constant sunlight. You will likely measure less than this depending on the intensity of the sun.

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
10-Nov-15

Q:
Hi,
Can I connect that safely to a e-textile project (by fixing it on the frame of the textile picture)?
Could it provide enoough energy for 5 or more LEDs?
Can it connect with an Arduino device?
Thanks,
Melanie
Asked by: Melanie
A:

You would need to connect the solar cells to some rechargeable batteries these would then be connected to the Arduino and LEDs. You would also need to use a diode to stop the batteries discharging through the solar cell when it gets dark.

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
20-Oct-15

Q:
Dear Sir,

I want to use this cell to light up a light bulb, but how pls? What size Lithium battery would I need and what would I connect to what to light up my ordinary old fashioned light bulb, please?
Asked by: Miss H Akhtar
A:

Ordinary light bulbs will only run from alternating current, batteries supply direct current and as such you wouldn’t be able to create this circuit.

Answered by: Michael Lockhart
11-Sep-15

Q:
If I wired this upto a end of an iPad charger do u know if it would charge it
Asked by: Lewis
A:
It wouldn't charge it. The main reason being the cell is 3V and an iPad charger uses 5V.

I would advise you not to try to modify a charger for such a device as there's a good chance you could end up destroying your iPad or even starting a fire.

These devices all use Lithium type batteries which are known to catch fire if charged incorrectly or otherwise damaged.
Answered by: Aaron Sturman
14-Oct-14

Q:
Please can you tell me how long do your SOLAR CELLS last? Barry.
Asked by: Barry
A:
Pmax (the maximum power the cell can provide) will decay by about 10% every 10 years. Of course this is effected by things such as temperature and weather exposure so your mileage may vary, but they last a pretty long time and slowly lose efficiency rather than outright failing.
Answered by: Aaron Sturman
01-May-14

Q:
I have two questions:
1. Are these panels waterproof?
2. Can I wire 2 groups of 4 panels in series in parallel? So this would create a total of 12V output?
Asked by: Dan
A:
The panels are fairly water resistant as they are coated in an epoxy resin.

4 cells in series gives 12V yes. Two groups of 4 could also be put in parallel for more current. Please remember though that the current rating of the solar cells is an ideal maximum under perfect conditions. In reality you get a lot less.
Answered by: Aaron Sturman
23-Apr-14

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